• 7-October-2017


    Women's Economic Empowerment in Selected MENA Countries - The Impact of Legal Frameworks in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia

    This report examines how current legal provisions in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia are impacting women’s ability to fully participate in economic life, both as employees and entrepreneurs. It is based on a comparative analysis of the various rights set out in constitutions, personal status laws, labour laws, in addition to tax and business laws. The report recognises the considerable progress made – in particular in the aftermath of the 2011 uprisings – following the adoption of constitutional and institutional reforms to strengthen women’s status.

    Yet ensuring sufficient opportunities for women remains a challenge in the six countries. The report suggests that this may be due to different factors such as: the existence of certain laws that are gender discriminatory, contradictions between various legal frameworks, lack of enforcement mechanisms, and barriers for women in accessing justice.  Through targeted policies, countries can tackle these challenges, and help unleash women’s potential to boost growth, competitiveness and inclusive social development.

  • 17-August-2017


    Talent Abroad: A Review of Moroccan Emigrants

    Close to 3 million people who were born in Morocco lived in OECD countries in 2010/11. To assess the potential that this group represents for the Moroccan economy, this review looks at the distribution of Moroccan emigrants over OECD countries, as well as their age, sex, and educational attainment. It analyses the labour market outcomes of Moroccan emigrants and documents the characteristics of return migrants in Morocco. Moroccan emigrants primarily reside in France, followed by Spain and Italy, where their numbers grew strongly before flows were affected by the economic crisis. Moroccan emigrants have lower educational attainment and less favourable labour market outcomes than native-born persons in destination countries, and many work in low-skill occupations. Those who have returned to Morocco are often retired, but they are also especially likely to become entrepreneurs there.

  • 24-May-2017


    Morocco African Economic Outlook 2017

    Morocco’s economy grew by an estimated 1.5% in 2016 due to the adverse impact of poor rainfall but the economy is projected to grow by 3.7% in 2017. Parliamentary elections in October 2016 were won by the right-wing Islamist Justice and Development Party.

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  • 23-May-2017


    OECD Review of Risk Management Policies Morocco

    This study analyses initiatives undertaken in Morocco to support the management of critical risks. It covers steps taken by central government and local authorities, research centres, the private sector, and civil society. It focuses particularly on questions relating to the governance of risks, co-ordination, and the engagement of key stakeholders. The analysis looks at the entire risk management cycle, including risk assessment, prevention and mitigation, emergency response and management, recovery and reconstruction. It also identifies the challenges that Morocco still needs address in order to improve the resilience of its economy and society to critical risks.

  • 22-May-2017


    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 9-November-2016


    COP22 session on enabling policies for green investment and development

    9 November 2016, Marrakesh - This COP22 side event will focus on the role of policies and domestic enabling conditions to encourage private investment in green infrastructure in developing countries, drawing on lessons learned from country-specific experiences in Jordan and Viet Nam.

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  • 4-November-2016


    Global Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes Peer Reviews: Morocco 2016 - Phase 2: Implementation of the Standard in Practice

    This report contains the 2014 “Phase 2: Implementation of the Standards in Practice” Global Forum review of Morocco.

    The Global Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes is the multilateral framework within which work in the area of tax transparency and exchange of information is carried out by over 130 jurisdictions which participate in the work of the Global Forum on an equal footing.

    The Global Forum is charged with in-depth monitoring and peer review of the implementation of the standards of transparency and exchange of information for tax purposes. These standards are primarily reflected in the 2002 OECD Model Agreement on Exchange of Information on Tax Matters and its commentary, and in Article 26 of the OECD Model Tax Convention on Income and on Capital and its commentary as updated in 2004, which has been incorporated in the UN Model Tax Convention.

    The standards provide for international exchange on request of foreseeably relevant information for the administration or enforcement of the domestic tax laws of a requesting party. “Fishing expeditions” are not authorised, but all foreseeably relevant information must be provided, including bank information and information held by fiduciaries, regardless of the existence of a domestic tax interest or the application of a dual criminality standard.

    All members of the Global Forum, as well as jurisdictions identified by the Global Forum as relevant to its work, are being reviewed. This process is undertaken in two phases. Phase 1 reviews assess the quality of a jurisdiction’s legal and regulatory framework for the exchange of information, while Phase 2 reviews look at the practical implementation of that framework. Some Global Forum members are undergoing combined – Phase 1 plus Phase 2 – reviews. The ultimate goal is to help jurisdictions to effectively implement the international standards of transparency and exchange of information for tax purposes.

  • 30-September-2016


    Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology Pilot Study: Morocco

    To reduce its heavy dependence on imported fossil fuels, achieve its ambitious climate goals and meet growing energy demand, the Moroccan government has launched a comprehensive plan to increase the share of renewable energy and improve energy efficiency. It set a target of 42% of its installed electricity generation capacity to come from renewable sources, with the goal rising to 52% by 2030. At the same time, Morocco aims to reduce its energy consumption by 12% by 2020, and 15% by 2030 through increased energy efficiency.

    Due to the country’s determination to increase energy efficiency and its supportive policy environment, the IEA selected Morocco for a pilot study of the new Clean Energy Technology Assessment Methodology (CETAM). This methodology, developed with the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), aims to provide clear, transparent information about clean energy technology markets in emerging economies. The goal is to identify the most promising clean energy technologies for policy support and investment and to establish metrics for tracking their deployment over time.

    Morocco has an abundance of renewable resources, especially wind and solar power, and is a regional leader in deploying clean energy technologies. This report assesses the range of technological options on both the demand and supply side to determine which show the most potential for further development, in line with the country’s policy goals and resource endowment.

  • 25-May-2016


    Improving the Management of Major Risks in Morocco

    Launch of the OECD review of the risk management policies in Morocco. The review provides an objective assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of Morocco's risk management policies by international experts.

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  • 1-April-2016


    Rising tax revenues are key to economic development in African countries

    Tax revenues in African countries are rising as a proportion of national incomes, according to the inaugural edition of Revenue Statistics in Africa. In 2014, the eight countries covered by the report - Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Mauritius, Morocco, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa and Tunisia - reported tax revenues as a percentage of GDP ranging from 16.1% to 31.3%.

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