Latest Documents


  • 7-December-2017

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Finland 2017

    The review assesses the performance of Finland, including how its commitment to the 2030 Agenda translates into action on the ground and how it can strengthen its partnerships with a view to adopting a whole-of-Finland approach in the face of steep budget cuts.

  • 15-November-2017

    English

    Addressing Forced Displacement through Development Planning and Co-operation - Guidance for Donor Policy Makers and Practitioners

    Despite the increasingly protracted nature of situations of forced displacement, development policy makers and practitioners have tended to overlook the longevity of displacement. Forced displacement has long been viewed primarily as an emergency humanitarian issue by providers of development co-operation and the focus of the international community has predominantly been on addressing the immediate protection and short-term humanitarian needs of forcibly displaced persons. However, with increasing levels of new and protracted displacement, and key commitments such as the 2030 Agenda, donors are looking at the role of development actors and financing in supporting sustainable and comprehensive solutions to forced displacement.  This Guidance, therefore, provides a clear and practical introduction to the challenges faced in working in situations of forced displacement, and provides guidance to donor staff seeking to mainstream responses to forced displacement into development planning and co-operation. While recognising that donor policies and responses are constantly evolving, this guidance proposes that donors responding to these situations prioritise three broad areas of work, where they can best contribute to existing capacities at the national, regional and global levels. It also identifies twelve actions, grouped under four key principles, outlining what donors can do to reinforce the capacities of key actors to respond to refugees and Internally Displaced Persons at the national, regional and global levels, and to advance comprehensive solutions.

  • 6-November-2017

    English

    Evaluating multilateral effectiveness - work of the DAC Evaluation Network

    Overview of the DAC Evaluation Network's current work on multilateral effectiveness, including development effectiveness reviews and UNEG-DAC peer reviews of evaluation systems.

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  • 31-October-2017

    English

    A New DAC: Innovations for the 2030 Agenda - High Level Meeting, 30-31 October 2017

    How can we modernise the monitoring of official development assistance (ODA) so that the metrics both reflect the evolution of donors' efforts and account for what developing countries effectively receive? How can the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) reform and innovate?

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  • 31-October-2017

    English

    Green Finance and Investment in Developing Countries

    To meet the ambitious goals of the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement, we need to significantly shift and scale up green finance and investment.

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  • 31-October-2017

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - The Economy of Illicit Trade in West Africa

    This report shows how criminal economies and illicit financial flows through and within West Africa affect people’s lives. It goes beyond the traditional analysis of illicit financial flows, which focuses on the value of monetary flows. The report exposes the ways in which criminal and illicit activities and resulting illicit financial flows damage governance, the economy, development and security. It presents case studies based on concrete examples from West Africa of human trafficking, drug smuggling, counterfeit goods, gold mining and terrorism financing. It identifies networks and drivers – in the region or elsewhere – that allow these criminal economies to thrive, by feeding and facilitating these activities and the circulation of illicitly-obtained revenue. It also examines the impacts on local communities, such as changes in wealth distribution, power dynamics and the degree to which illicit money undermines social organisation.

    This book proposes a policy framework for both source and destination countries of illicit flows that looks beyond the concerns of developed countries to enhance development prospects at the local level and respond to the needs of the most vulnerable stakeholders. Combating criminal economies and preventing illicit financial flows will require sustained partnerships between producing and consuming countries. West Africa cannot be expected to address these challenges alone.

  • 20-October-2017

    English

    Infrastructure finance by bilateral and multilateral development partners

    Infrastructure — such as water and sanitation, transport, energy and communications — is fundamental for economic growth, poverty reduction and human development.

  • 19-October-2017

    English

    Luxembourg is a generous aid donor and solid ally to partner countries

    Already one of the most generous providers of aid, Luxembourg has strengthened its development co-operation in recent years. It could build on this by setting out a clear vision for the future that factors in new risks of instability in fragile countries and ensures no vulnerable groups are overlooked, according to a new OECD Review.

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  • 19-October-2017

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Luxembourg 2017

    This review assesses the performance of Luxembourg, including looking at its efforts towards climate finance, the impact of its concentration on the quality of its portfolio and its vision for partnerships.

  • 17-October-2017

    English

    Development Co-operation Report 2017 - Data for Development

    The 2017 volume of the  Development Co-operation Report focuses on Data for Development. “Big Data” and “the Internet of Things” are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way that economies and societies are functioning across the planet. The Sustainable Development Goals along with the data revolution are opportunities that should not be missed: more and better data can help boost inclusive growth, fight inequalities and combat climate change. These data are also essential to measure and monitor progress against the Sustainable Development Goals.

    The value of data in enabling development is uncontested. Yet, there continue to be worrying gaps in basic data about people and the planet and weak capacity in developing countries to produce the data that policy makers need to deliver reforms and policies that achieve real, visible and long-lasting development results. At the same time, investing in building statistical capacity – which represented about 0.30% of ODA in 2015 – is not a priority for most providers of development assistance.

    There is a need for stronger political leadership, greater investment and more collective action to bridge the data divide for development. With the unfolding data revolution, developing countries and donors have a unique chance to act now to boost data production and use for the benefit of citizens. This report sets out priority actions and good practices that will help policy makers and providers of development assistance to bridge the global data divide, notably by strengthening statistical systems in developing countries to produce better data for better policies and better lives.

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