Latest Documents


  • 31-October-2017

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - Illicit Trade and Development Challenges in West Africa

    This report shows how criminal economies and illicit financial flows through and within West Africa affect people’s lives. It goes beyond the traditional analysis of illicit financial flows, which focuses on the value of monetary flows. The report exposes the ways in which criminal and illicit activities and resulting illicit financial flows damage governance, the economy, development and security. It presents case studies based on concrete examples from West Africa of human trafficking, drug smuggling, counterfeit goods, gold mining and terrorism financing. It identifies networks and drivers – in the region or elsewhere – that allow these criminal economies to thrive, by feeding and facilitating these activities and the circulation of illicitly-obtained revenue. It also examines the impacts on local communities, such as changes in wealth distribution, power dynamics and the degree to which illicit money undermines social organisation.

    This book proposes a policy framework for both source and destination countries of illicit flows that looks beyond the concerns of developed countries to enhance development prospects at the local level and respond to the needs of the most vulnerable stakeholders. Combating criminal economies and preventing illicit financial flows will require sustained partnerships between producing and consuming countries. West Africa cannot be expected to address these challenges alone.

  • 30-October-2017

    English

    Development Co-operation Report 2017 - Data for Development

    Ninety per cent of all the world’s data were generated in the last two years alone. “Big data” and the “Internet of things” are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way economies and societies are functioning across the planet. This is an opportunity that should not to be missed: more and better data can help boost inclusive growth, fight inequalities and combat climate change. These data are also essential to measure and monitor progress against the Sustainable Development  Goals.
     
    The value of data in enabling development is uncontested. Yet, we still lack good quality data in most developing countries. Why are over half of deaths and one-third of births worldwide unaccounted for? Why is investment in statistical capacity - 0.25% of ODA - not a priority for most providers of development assistance?

    There is a need for stronger political leadership, greater investment and more collective action to bridge the data divide. This report makes a strong business case for strengthening national statistical systems. With the unfolding data revolution, developing countries and donors have a unique chance to act now to boost data production and use for the benefit of citizens. This volume sets out a number of priority steps and good practices that will help policy makers and providers of development assistance to make data work for development.

    The profiles of providers of development co-operation (Part II of this report) are already available. The full report will be released in October 2017.

  • 13-September-2017

    English

    Refugees and forced displacement

    This work area covers the topic of refugees and forced displacement. Reports and papers on this page draw from evaluation findings from the DAC Network on Development Evaluation members. Evaluations of strategy and programming in many refugee contexts bring to light complex realities that are faced on the ground in countries of origin, transit and destination.

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  • 13-September-2017

    English

    Responding to Refugee Crises: Lessons from evaluations in Afghanistan as a country of origin

    This working paper is a case study on Afghanistan as a refugee country of origin. The case study looks at whole-of-government efforts by OECD member countries in Afghanistan, specifically looking at how states have co-ordinated development, diplomatic and defence resources in a refugee country of origin.

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  • 13-September-2017

    English

    Responding to Refugee Crises: Lessons from evaluations in Ethiopia and Uganda as countries of destination

    This working paper is a case study on Ethiopia and Uganda as countries of destination for refugees. The case study looks at the approaches adopted in Ethiopia and Uganda to promote refugee self-reliance and enable refugees to work to earn income. It compares outcomes in the countries, with a specific focus on access to employment and business creation, including legal and socio-economic barriers.

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  • 13-September-2017

    English

    Responding to Refugee Crises: Lessons from evaluations in South Sudan as a country of origin

    This working paper is a case study on South Sudan as an important refugee country of origin. The case study looks at issues of forced displacement in South Sudan and underscores the linkages between internally displaced persons and South Sudanese refugees

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  • 13-September-2017

    English

    Responding to Refugee Crises in Developing Countries: What Can We Learn From Evaluations?

    This paper covers the key areas and priority topics related to forced displacement identified by the Development Assisstance Committee Temporary Working Group on Refugees and Migration. It draws from evaluation findings to highlight key lessons and recommendations for positive change going forward.

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  • 12-September-2017

    English

    Aid to the Water and Sanitation sector

    The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) collects aid flows at activity level based on a standard methodology and agreed definitions. The Aid to Water Supply and Sanitation sector is broken down into eleven sub sectors including policy, sanitation, supply, rivers and waste.

  • 30-August-2017

    English

    Amounts Mobilised from the Private Sector by Official Development Finance Interventions

    The 2016 survey shows that, in 2012-15, USD 81.1 billion was mobilised from the private sector by official development finance interventions in form of guarantees, syndicated loans, shares in collective investment vehicles (CIVs), credit lines and direct investment in companies.

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  • 7-August-2017

    English

    DAC and CRS code lists

    The DAC Secretariat maintains various codes lists which are used by donors to report on their aid flows to the DAC databases. In addition, these codes are used to classify information in the DAC databases.

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