• 12-March-2018


    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective – MAP Peer Review Report, Denmark (Stage 1) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, countries have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process. The minimum standard is complemented by a set of best practices.
    The peer review process is conducted in two stages.  Stage 1 assesses countries against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 1 peer review of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Denmark, which is accompanied by a document addressing the implementation of best practices which can be accessed on the OECD website.
  • 10-March-2018


    Nordic EV Outlook 2018 - Insights from leaders in electric mobility

    The Nordic region is at the forefront of the global growth of electric mobility. The Nordic Electric Vehicle Outlook (NEVO) aims to identify and discuss recent developments of electric mobility in the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The report assesses the current status of the electric car market, the deployment of charging infrastructure, and the integration with the electricity grid at country level. It analyses the role of European, national, and local policy frameworks in supporting these developments. The analysis also provides insights on consumer behaviour and includes an outlook on the progress of electric mobility in the Nordic region up to 2030.NEVO has been developed in co-operation between the International Energy Agency (IEA) and Nordic Energy Research. It builds on the long-standing IEA engagement in the area of electric mobility, including the co-ordination of the Electric Vehicles Initiative (EVI) and the hosting of the Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Technology Collaboration Programme.
  • 11-January-2018


    Better Regulation in Europe - The EU 15 project

    This project drew on the initiatives for Better Regulation promoted by both the EU and the OECD in 2010.

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  • 19-December-2017


    Government at a Glance

    Government at a Glance provides a dashboard of key indicators to help you analyse international comparisons of public sector performance.

  • 7-December-2017


    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Denmark 2017

    Denmark has a long tradition of setting ambitious national energy targets. In 2030, renewables should cover at least half of the country’s total energy consumption. By 2050, Denmark aims to be a low-carbon society independent of fossil fuels. The country is moving convincingly to meet these world-leading targets.The International Energy Agency’s latest review of Denmark’s energy policies focuses on two interrelated issues: how to integrate increasing volumes of variable renewable energy in the power system beyond its current share of 45%, and how to decarbonise the heating sector.Electricity generation in Denmark has changed fundamentally over the past two decades. Coal generation has been vastly eroded, and the bulk of power generation now comes from wind and bioenergy. Supported by a flexible domestic power system and a high level of interconnection, Denmark is now widely recognised as a global leader in integrating variable renewable energy while at the same time maintaining a highly reliable and secure electrical-power grid.The heating sector is also critical for Denmark’s low-carbon ambitions. Denmark’s large-scale use of combined heat and power plants with heat storage capacity, and the increasing deployment of wind power offer great potential for efficient integration of heat and electricity systems. However, policies and regulations need to be aligned to realise that potential. Finding the right levels of energy taxation is particularly important.Denmark has successfully decoupled its economic growth from greenhouse gas emissions, thanks to a combination of energy efficiency improvements, and fuel switching to renewables. As in all countries, more needs to be done to limit emissions from transport.
  • 23-November-2017


    Denmark: Country Health Profile 2017

    This report looks at the state of health in Denmark.
  • 23-November-2017

    English, PDF, 395kb

    Revenue Statistics: Key findings for Denmark

    The tax-to-GDP ratio in Denmark did not change between 2015 and 2016. The tax-to-GDP ratio remained at 45.9%. The corresponding figures for the OECD average were an increase of 0.3 percentage points from 34.0% to 34.3% over the same period.

  • 22-November-2017


    OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2017 - highlights by country

    These notes present selected country highlights from the OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2017 with a specific focus on digital trends among all themes covered.

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  • 17-November-2017


  • 15-November-2017

    English, PDF, 1,012kb

    How's life in Denmark?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2017.

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