Safety of manufactured nanomaterials

Focus

  • Testing Programme of Manufactured Nanomaterials

    The OECD reveals the release of information on the accuracy of tests used to determine the safety of nanomaterials. The safety of Manufactured Nanomaterials is an important concern impacting regulatory bodies throughout the world. Due to their size, Manufactured Nanomaterials may require additional testing beyond the standard suite of tests used for other chemicals, to ensure that the impact on human health and the environment is fully understood.

    Read more
  • Nanotechnology and Tyres

    The use of new nanomaterials in tyre production could help foster the sustainability of the tyre industry and reduce the environmental impact of vehicles, if the potential environmental, health and safety risks of the technology are managed carefully.

    Read more
  • OECD Council Recommendation

    This OECD Council Recommendation is a legal instrument which recommends that OECD member countries apply existing international and national chemical regulatory frameworks when managing the safety of nanomaterials. An important consequence of this Recommendation is that much of the data collected as part of the safety assessment of nanomaterials will fall within the scope of the OECD system for the Mutual Acceptance of Data (MAD) in the Assessment of Chemicals.

    Read more

As nanomaterials started to be used in commercial applications, OECD identified the need to analyse the potential safety concerns caused by manufactured nanomaterials. EHS launched a programme of work in 2006 to ensure that the approaches for hazard, exposure and risk assessment for manufactured nanomaterials are of a high quality, science-based and internationally harmonised.

What's new?

The OECD releases the first Test Guidelines developed specifically for nanomaterials.

Test Guidelines 318: Dispersion Stability of Nanomaterials in Simulated Environmental Media provides a simple and effective tool that can analyse the dispersion stability of nanomaterials in aqueous media. It is one of the prerequisites for a subsequent robust and reliable safety testing of nanomaterials.

The Test Guideline allows users to understand:

  • Their fate in natural waters; and
  • Their potential behaviour in test media.

Test Guideline 412: 28 days (Subacute) Inhalation Toxicity Study and Test Guideline 413: 90 days (Subchronic) Inhalation Toxicity Study have been updated to allow testing and hazard identification of inhaled nanomaterials. The updates concern: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) measurements; Particle-Size Distribution For Test Atmospheres; Post-Administration Duration; and Lung Burden Measurements. The information that will be gathered throught these new endpoints make it applicable for assessing potential inhalation hazards of nanomaterials, while the information that will be gathered will depeen our understanding on the mode of action by which nanomaterials may act.

 

Video - The Rise of Nanotechnology

VIDEO - The Rise of Nanotechnology

 

Manufactured nanomaterials are already revolutionising the way we produce (electronic goods, tyres, clothes and medicines) which raises questions regarding potential unintended hazards to humans and the environment and whether nanomaterials need special measures to deal with potential risks.

There is a need for a responsible and co-ordinated approach to ensure that potential safety issues are being addressed at the same time as the technology is developing.

Therefore, the EHS promotes international co-operation in human health and environmental safety aspects of manufactured nanomaterials. Its objective is to assist countries in their efforts to assess the safety implications of nanomaterials.

 

Publications

Nanotechnology and Tyres :
Elements for a Risk Assessment Framework

The best practices outlined in the Risk Assessment Framework (RAF) aim to provide a method for evaluating the potential human health and environmental concerns associated with the entire life cycle of nanomaterials used in tyres, focusing on the tyre manufacturing process.

Nanotechnology and Tyres :
Greening Industry and Transport

New nanomaterials offer promising avenues for future innovation, which can contribute towards the sustainability and resource efficiency of the tyre industry. Yet uncertainty over environmental health and safety (EHS) risks appears to be a main and continuous concern for the development of new nanomaterials.

Brochures

Six Years of OECD Work on the Safety of Manufactured Nanomaterials

This brochure outlines the achievements made so far by OECD in addressing the human health and environmental safety implications of manufactured nanomaterials.

Nanosafety at the OECD : the first five years 2006-2010

 

This booklet describes the work that OECD is doing to address the human health and environmental safety implications associated with the use of manufactured nanomaterials. It presents the OECD Nanosafety programmes during the first five years from 2006-2010.

Contact & Social Media