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Slovenia


  • 22-May-2019

    English

    Tax Revenue Implications of Decarbonising Road Transport - Scenarios for Slovenia

    This report investigates how tax revenue from transport fuels could evolve over time as vehicles rely less on fossil fuels, with a focus on the case study of the Republic of Slovenia. Reducing the reliance on fossil fuels in the transport sector is a welcome development from the perspective of its climate and health impacts and of reduced energy dependence. However, under current settings, reduced fuel use will also lead to a loss of tax revenues, which may put stress on government budgets. Based on simulations for Slovenia, with a 2050 horizon, the report provides an in-depth assessment of the taxation of road transport and investigates how tax policy could adapt to declining fossil fuel use in the long term if the objective is to maintain revenues at current levels while taking fairness and efficiency considerations into account. It finds that gradual tax reforms, with an evolving mix of taxes, shifting from taxes on fuel to taxes on distances driven, can contribute to more sustainable tax policy over the long term.
  • 11-April-2019

    English, PDF, 463kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Slovenia

    The tax wedge for the average single worker in Slovenia increased by 0.4 percentage points from 42.9 in 2017 to 43.3 in 2018. The OECD average tax wedge in 2018 was 36.1 (2017, 36.2).

  • 14-February-2019

    English

    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective - MAP Peer Review Report, Slovenia (Stage 1) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, countries have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process. The minimum standard is complemented by a set of best practices.  The peer review process is conducted in two stages. Stage 1 assesses countries against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 1 peer review of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Slovenia.
  • 5-December-2018

    English, PDF, 401kb

    Revenue Statistics: Key findings for Slovenia

    The tax-to-GDP ratio in Slovenia decreased by 0.5 percentage points, from 36.5% in 2016 to 36.0% in 2017. The corresponding figures for the OECD average were an increase of 0.2 percentage points from 34.0% to 34.2% over the same period.

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  • 17-September-2018

    English, PDF, 126kb

    Effective carbon rates: Key findings for Slovenia

    This country note for Slovenia provides detail on the proportion of CO2 emissions from energy use subject to different effective carbon rates (ECR), as well as on the level and components of average ECRs in each of the six economic sectors (road transport, off-road transport, industry, agriculture and fishing, residential & commercial, and electricity).

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  • 6-September-2018

    English

    Transfer Pricing Country Profiles

    These country profiles focus on countries' domestic legislation regarding key transfer pricing principles, including the arm's length principle, transfer pricing methods, comparability analysis, intangible property, intra-group services, cost contribution agreements, transfer pricing documentation, administrative approaches to avoiding and resolving disputes, safe harbours and other implementation measures.

  • 21-August-2018

    English

    OECD Tax Policy Reviews: Slovenia 2018

    This report is part of the OECD Tax Policy Reviews. The Reviews are intended to provide independent, comprehensive and comparative assessments of OECD member and non-member countries’ tax systems as well as concrete recommendations for tax policy reform. By identifying tailored tax policy reform options, the objective of the Reviews is to enhance the design of existing tax policies and to support the adoption of new reforms.This report provides a comprehensive tax policy assessment of the taxes paid by individuals in Slovenia as well as tax reform recommendations. The report is divided into six chapters, with a summary of the main findings upfront, followed by more detailed recommendations at the end of chapters 3 to 6.  Chapter 1 sets the scene for tax reform in Slovenia. Chapter 2 focuses on the labour market, social policy and tax policy related challenges. The ensuing chapters assess the financing of the social security system (Chapter 3), identify strategies to strengthen the design of personal income tax (Chapter 4), indirect taxes (Chapter 5), and the taxation of capital income at the individual level (Chapter 6).
  • 13-June-2018

    English

    Reshaping the Personal Income Tax in Slovenia

    This report presents a tax reform package that prepares Slovenia for the ageing of its population. Slovenia faces a window of opportunity for a comprehensive tax reform that rebalances the tax mix away from employee social security contributions (SSCs) towards the personal income tax (PIT).

  • 12-April-2018

    English, PDF, 264kb

    Taxation Household Savings: Key findings for Slovenia

    This note presents marginal effective tax rates (METRs) that summarise the tax system’s impact on the incentives to make an additional investment in a particular type of savings. By comparing METRs on different types of household savings, we can gain insights into which assets or savings types receive the most favourable treatment from the tax system

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  • 22-March-2018

    English

    Milestone in BEPS implementation: Multilateral BEPS Convention will enter into force on 1 July following Slovenia’s ratification

    The Multilateral Convention to Implement Tax Treaty Related Measures to Prevent Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (the “Convention”) will enter into force on 1 July 2018, marking a significant step in international efforts to update the existing network of bilateral tax treaties and reduce opportunities for tax avoidance by multinational enterprises.

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